Grand slams are great, but they’re not always walk-offs

From today’s Daily Prompt:

Grand Slam: In your own life, what would be the equivalent of a walk-off home run? (For the baseball-averse, that’s a last-minute, back-against-the-wall play that guarantees a dramatic victory.)”

This is all over the place with baseball jargon. First of all, a “Grand Slam” is a bases-loaded home run, which generates four runs and clears the bases. A “walk-off” anything is a scoring play that wins the game immediately (hence, you get to walk off the field right after it happens). This usually occurs in the bottom of the ninth or extra inning. Sure, a walk-off home run is dramatic, but not more so than say a walk-off steal of home for the winning run. By the way, a grand slam doesn’t always win the game. You can hit one down by eight runs and you’d still be way behind.

“Last minute” has no bearing on baseball, the only major sport with no time limitations. (Sorry, I don’t consider cricket a major sport, even if my Commonwealth friends will kill me.) “Back against the wall” implies a must-win situation. I’d consider a walk-off as a clutch play, but not back against the wall unless it is a win-or-go-home situation (like say the bottom of the ninth in a wild card elimination game, with your team down one and the tying run on first, you’re down to your last out and have two strikes).

Sorry Daily Prompt, you got my sports jargon hackles up. 🙂  In real life, any successful roll of the dice in a situation with the odds firmly against you can be considered a walk-off play. I always like to plan anything I do, so I always know the risks and odds of any situation I get myself into. If I need a clutch play to win, either it’s premeditated and the damage of losing isn’t significant, or I’m doing it very wrong.

Play ball!

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